Weather Awareness Guide for Daytona Beach
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from the base of a thunderstorm down to the ground. Tornado intensities are classified on the Fujita Scale with ratings between F0 (weakest) to F5 (strongest). They are capable of completely destroying well-made structures, uprooting trees and hurling objects through the air like deadly missiles. These tips for taking cover are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Take shelter immediately if a warning is issued or you see a funnel cloud nearby. However,…
Floods are among the most frequent and costly natural disasters, according to the American Red Cross.Conditions that cause floods include heavy or steady rain for several hours or days that saturates the ground.Flash floods occur suddenly due to rapidly rising water along a stream or low-lying area. The organization offers the following tips for coping with flood conditions: * If flooding is predicted, be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice. When a warning is issued for your area, head for higher ground and stay…
Wildfires remain a constant threat in Florida, with seasonal droughts and frequent lightning. Tips for reducing your home’s vulnerability to wildfire damage may be found at firewise.org. The American Red Cross offers this advice for residents who learn their homes are in a fire’s potential path: Be ready to leave at a moment’s notice. Listen to local radio and television stations for updated emergency information. Always back your car into the garage or park it in an open space facing the direction of escape. Confine…
A thunderstorm is considered severe if it produces hail at least 1 inch in diameter or has wind gusts of at least 58 miles per hour. Every thunderstorm produces lightning, which kills more people each year than tornadoes or hurricanes. Heavy rain from thunderstorms can cause flash flooding and high winds can damage homes and blow down trees and utility poles, causing widespread power outages. Here’s what the American Red Cross and other experts say you should do:Listen to local news or NOAA Weather Radio…